Arktan LiveBlogging Turns the Social Web Into Your Live Blogging Platform

Arktan LiveBlogging is born from the recognition that the Social Web is the future of live event coverage.

Journalists can harness the power of existing social media tools – such as Twitter, Tumblr, YouTube, Twitvid, Instagram, and many more – to tell stories on their own websites.

Journalists can simply Tweet, Tumble or post to popular social networking tools, and those posts are aggregated into a real-time embedded stream on their site.

Top brands such as USA Network and Newsweek already use the product to drive engagement, and increase profit on their sites.

Using the Arktan LiveBlogging dashboard you can create a LiveBlog in minutes and embed it anywhere.

You can also customize the look and feel of your LiveBlog to match the colors, fonts and other styles of your existing website.

Arktan LiveBlogging will also extract videos, photos, maps, and more from links and display them in line. Your audience can view media from TwitPic, yfrog, TweetPhoto, YouTube, Twitvid, and more right in the stream.

Each LiveBlog post encourages users to like, reply or share, using their favorite social login. This encourages conversation, driving engagement and increasing time spent.

Arktan LiveBlogging also displays @replies to each tweet as threaded replies! A first in the industry. Of course, moderation and spam detection capabilities are in-built so that site owners can control the conversation.

USA Network uses Arktan LiveBlogging to power live blogging on their “Character Chatter” site to drive user engagement during popular TV shows, such as Psych and Burn Notice.

NewsWeek uses Arktan LiveBlogging for live blog events, such as the the 2011 Oscars.

A thought-provoking post on Guardian by Matt Wells provides a perspective on how live blogging is transforming journalism.

Some of the advantages and disadvantages of live blogging that are described here are influenced by the interview with Martin Belam. The discussion gets even more interesting in this article titled “Are live blogs the future of journalism?” by Meghan Hartsell.