US Federal Government Adopting OpenID

JanRain has been fortunate to participate in a series of meetings with federal goverment agencies over the past several months to discuss deploying OpenID on federal websites.

During two separate meetings with Vivek Kundra, the Federal CIO, he explained that a major priority for the federal government is transparency and “citizen engagement.” Accordingly, the government is aggressively pursuing open standard technologies that enable and support these objectives.

At the Gov 2.0 Summit in Washington DC, the General Services Administration and several government agencies announced their plans to adopt OpenID as part of the White House’s Open Government Initiative.

This announcement followed several months of research and discussion between the OpenID Foundation, OIDF member companies, the GSA, NIST, OMB, the InfoCard Foundation, and various government agencies.

The Identity, Credential, and Access Management (ICAM) committee of the GSA published its Identity Scheme Adoption Process, Trust Framework Provider Adoption Process, and OpenID 2.0 Government Profile documents over the last couple of months.

Initial identity providers include Yahoo, Google, AOL, Verisign, and PayPal who are undergoing certification processes defined in the TFPAP. The first wave of federal websites to accept these identity providers will include the Center for Information Technology (CIT), National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and related agencies.

This is an exciting development for OpenID that will provide significant benefits to federal agencies and the citizens that they serve by facilitating faster registration and login to online resources, while allowing citizens to provide timely feedback to the agencies that serve them.

If you’re interested in deploying OpenID on your website, you can find out more at the OpenID Foundation website or have a look at our RPX offering which is already being used by thousands of commercial websites around the world.

If you’d like to read some additional posts on this topic, please check out the following: